Tools

‘A ship in port is safe, but this is not what ships are built for.  - Grace Hopper

There is nothing inherently good or bad about a hammer.

It is useless if it’s left in the drawer–paintings left to collect dust in boxes, Ikea dressers disassembled in their original packaging, a calendar lying unhung halfway through it’s calendar year.

It is only a tool, and it is useful only when it is being used.  It can be used in so many ways, but there’s only a few things it was made to do: drive home nails, take out nails, smash things.  Of course, you could also carry it around and use it to knock on people’s doors with, as a back-scratcher, to play catch with.

But those last few aren’t ideal.  They’d get the job done in each of those last few scenarios, but in an extremely inefficient way.

There’s a few ideas here I’ve been mulling over that seem to apply to all tools:

1. Tools are made to be used.  

A pot was made to be cooked in.

Paintbrushes were made to paint with.

Running shoes were made to run in.

Tools are only useful when used.  Don’t let them sit and gather dust.

2. Tools are made to be used in a specific way.

You could use a speaker as a chair, or you could sit on a chair.

You could use a butter knife to cut a watermelon, or you could use it to spread butter.

You could use your desk as a space to write a book, or as a dumping ground for wrinkled clothing.

Each option would work, but which one is a pleasure and which one causes frustration?  Impatience?  Using a tool for its intended use makes things simpler and more efficient.

3. Tools are neither inherently good or bad.  

You could use a hammer to hang some shelves… or you could use it as a murder weapon.

You could use your iphone to share photos of your creations… or you could use it to waste time refreshing your facebook feed.

You could use your legs to propel yourself in a swimming pool… or you could kick your neighbor.

You could use your brain to empower you, or you could use it to produce degrading thoughts about yourself.

You could use your hands to create a sculpture, or you could use them to pick at imperfections.

4. Tools are everywhere

Almost everything is a tool.  That is to say, there is a way to use it.  From literal tools like a wrench, to everyday items like combs, to every part of your body and your mind.. these things are here to enhance your experience of life, if you use them, and you use them for good and not evil.

The value lies in the usage.  The user decides how to use the tool.  Therefore, the value is created by the user.  The decision, the power is in how you choose to use the tool.

Use the tools at hand to enhance your life and the lives around you.


Joining the iPhone Club

Five years after iPhone was first released, I’m finally joining the club today.

The reasons I didn’t get one until now ranged from the fact that they were unnecessary– that all I needed on a phone was to call and text, that I didn’t need the bells and whistles, especially at the extra price tag.  But the biggest reason of all was that I didn’t feel I could trust myself to use it efficiently.

Now that the cell phone companies have eliminated the excuse of a high price (they make it just about the same price and sometimes even more expensive to buy a new “basic” phone as they do to buy a smart phone), and realizing how handy some of the apps would be on the road and in navigating daily life, I had only one reason left that could get in the way.  My mindset.

“Technology alone is not enough. It’s tecnology married with the liberal arts, the humanities, that gives us the result that makes our hearts sing.” – Steve Jobs

I always knew that if I were to get one, I’d have to have reached a level of maturity that I could wield my iPhone for good and not evil.  iPhones are extemely powerful, and we all know that with great power comes great responsibility.  Pirates had swords to do their bidding, and we have smart phones.

Since having an iphone is a great responsibility, I must treat it accordingly.  As a young college kid addicted to constantly refreshing facebook in 2007, I knew that I was not ready.

Maybe you’re thinking that’s a little dramatic–it’s just a phone, right?  Well, really, it’s a tool.  And no tool is inherently good or evil.  But you can use it proactively, or you can use it against people and against yourself.  You can use it to enhance life, or you can use it to distract you.  To connect, or to disconnect.  The choice is yours, whether you want it or not.

Before I took on this responsibility, I wanted to make sure I could handle it.  I wanted to make sure I had outgrown my other technologies, and truly lived my life fully knowing that I could live without it.

Now I know that I can live without it, because I have done my whole life.

But I now feel ready to wield my power responsibly.  But before I dive in, I want to set some guidelines for what is “good” and “evil” in my iPhone usage.  Because, after all, I am human, and we do tend to make a butt load of mistakes ;)

GOOD iPHONE USES

- Note taking: I use sticky notes on my computer and a TextEdit document to compile my notes and to-do list.  So unless I’m at my computer, I’m always writing stuff down in a ton of locations.  In draft text messages on my phone, taking photos of things to remind me, scribbling on notes here and there, writing them all over my physical notebook.  I’ll be eliminating at least two gathering points by jotting down most of my notes on my iPhone, which I’ll be doing since it will be near me more often than the other items.

- Instagram & Camera: I’ve been photographing for 10 years now, studied it, loved it, and continue to do it every single day.  I have a bulky digital SLR which I use for events and travel, but I’m looking forward to putting away/selling/donating my point-and-shoot, which is less powerful than the iPhone camera and using it means I carry a phone and a camera at all times.  I’ll be saving space and upgrading the actual camera technology, while being able to share photos more rapidly and efficiently.

- Youtube/video: The camera upgrade is already massive, and as I am just getting into youtubing my adventures, I’m looking forward to capturing these moments in higher quality and sharing them more efficiently.

- Not having to bring my computer everywhere: I like having the option of working when I get a burst of inspiration, and also being able to use internet when I want to.  I’ve been known to lug around my 6-year-old hulk of a macbook through big cities, and having a computer for a phone means I can give my back some much needed rest and get up and go more quickly.

- Maps/directions: I travel regularly, and when I’m not traveling, I live in Los Angeles.  In both scenarios, I’m going to new places on a regular basis.  Having an iPhone means I no longer have to google map before I leave and take a photograph of it on my point-and-shoot camera and zoom in to scrutinize the blurry little map while I’m on the freeway.

- Emergencies: I imagine it’s going to be pretty damn handy in a stitch.  As my friend Hannah pointed out though, there’s a fine line between convenience and laziness.

- Update twitter/facebook: Not having to remember what I want to say until I get back to a computer means I can free up mental space.  Especially useful for my entrepreneurial projects and pages. Think it, type it, publish.

BEFORE I DIVE IN

Before I even start using it properly, I want to make a pact to myself that this iPhone will be birthed into an organized environment.

After 6 years of inconsistent file naming on my home computer, totally disorganized folders, photos this way and that, documents here and there, 3 hard drives, music in all the wrong places, and a digital clutter of the worst degree, I realized that I really should have taken those extra 20 seconds now and then to create some consistency on my hunk-a-hunk-a burning love macbook.

I’ve slowly been working through the mess and bringing it back to a clean, simple, organized environment, but how much easier would it all have been if I had just started it right?  This is my public vow, to myself and to the world, that I will organize from the beginning, taking care to learn and instate processes which will clarify and enhance usability.

BAD iPHONE USES

- Mindless facebook: This was the big one.  In younger years I spent a truly embarrassing amount of time refreshing facebook, waiting for notifications, riding on the highs of attention, wallowing in the lows of nothing-new-to-see.  Somehow I finally stopped that bad habit, and use it consciously to stay connected with friends and family.  However, history always has a chance of repeating itself and I want to make sure I’m aware of that so that I don’t slip back into old ways.

- Constant email: What was once a facebook addiction in college gradually grew into an email addiction after graduation.  With real work and clients and meeting people and new friends, it’s a constant barrage of information and people awaiting your reply.  You can just as easily get sucked into email as facebook, and I let myself drown in it for a while.  But, I learned my lesson again and, for the most part, am good at respecting the line between keeping in touch and drowning in my inbox.  I don’t want to be constantly updated, I don’t want to know who’s written to me, and I definitely don’t want my phone to make a noise or pop up every time I get a new message.  What I don’t know can’t affect me, and I intend to keep my mental clarity and sanity in tact by keeping up my “once a week email-a-thon” and intermittent checking.  I say when it’s time to email, not my phone.  Step back, biotch.

- Using it in social situations instead of participating in real life conversations and connections: One of my biggest pet peeves is when you’re talking with someone and they whip out their phone and multitask.  I won’t lie, my feelings get a little hurt.  If we’re hanging out, let’s be together.  I don’t like to be multitasked on, and I will do my damndest not to multitask on you.

I think that’s about it.  Let the madness begin.